twist&sob
Catherine, 17, England
  • electrictattoos:

    sufferme:

    STEAL THE NIGHT. A Barn Swallow on Jenna from Columbus. Memento mori piece for her late mother. Take care. mike moses www.thedrowntown.com

    Mike Moses

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  • theimpalasociopath:

    Love, Live, Love, Die. It’s a circle, Cas.

    This was originally done for my composition class, but here you go.

    (via blushingmisha)

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  • "I think Cas would approach the birthday party of a 9-year-old girl with same intensity as Apocalyptic events… The thing about Cas is that he doesn’t really have a barometer in the same way… To him, everything is important."
    Misha at Vancon 2014 (x)

    (Source: bittercasgirl, via astudyincastiel)

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  • "

    I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

    The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

    1. She will know her feelings are valid.
    2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

    The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

    3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

    The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

    4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even as a parent, have no right to violate them.
    5. No one has a right to violate them.

    The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

    6. She is entitled to her expression.

    When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

    7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

    I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

    "
    Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

    (via tentacle-dick)

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  • todayinhistory:

    August 28th 1955: Emmett Till murdered

    On this day in 1955, the 14-year-old African-American boy Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi. While visiting family in the state, Till allegedly flirted with the young white shopkeeper Carolyn Bryant while buying candy. Bryant told her husband and a few nights later he and his half-brother abducted Till and brutally tortured and murdered him. His mutilated body was found three days later in the Tallahatchie river; Till’s face was unrecognisable, but he was identified by the ring he wore engraved with his father’s initials that his mother gave him before he left for Mississppi. The viciousness of this unprovoked, racially-motivated crime sent shockwaves throughout the nation. The case drew attention to the oppression of African-Americans throughout the nation and provided a name and a face to the threat of lynching. Till’s mother Mamie, a highly educated woman who went on to become a devoted fighter for African-American equality, insisted on an open-casket funeral in order to show the world what was done to her young son. Thousands attended the funeral and thousands more saw the horrific images of Till’s body. Due to the fierce reactions the murder had engendered it was a particularly painful, but sadly expected, outcome when the all-white jury in Mississippi acquitted Till’s killers, despite Till’s great-uncle openly identifying them in court. A few months later the killers, now protected by double jeopardy laws, sold their story to Look magazine and openly confessed to the murder in chilling detail. Taking place a year after the Supreme Court outlawed school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, the outrage over the murder galvanised the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement. 100 days after Emmett Till’s murder Rosa Parks, on her way back from a rally for Till hosted by the then-unknown Martin Luther King Jr., refused to give up her seat for a white man on an Alabama bus. This sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, thus beginning the movement that would result in the dismantling of the system of Jim Crow segregation and win successes in promoting African-American social and political equality.

    (via charlotteesther)

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  • notenoughtosurvive:

    unamusedsloth:

    Nude Portraits series by photographer Trevor Christensen

    This is my new favorite thing

    (via compadre-please-weep-for-me)

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  • (Source: dailyellenpage, via petersqvill)

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  • (Source: captbritain)

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  • fallencastiel:

    "Where am I? Where’s the road?"

    (via detectiveintheimpala)

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  • (Source: tallwhitney, via sireclotpole)

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